houseplants

NASA released a report about air purifying houseplants in 1989 which was converted into really helpful infographics. These are the 18 plants that purify the air around you.

 

Our air is tainted with toxins on a daily basis but you can breathe easy because there is an extensive list of houseplants that can help combat the toxins present in the air. We recently saw a helpful infographic that discusses the best plants to have in your home to purify it.

The plants were part of a research project conducted by NASA in 1989 to help improve the quality of the air within their buildings.  The findings are still relevant today.

These are the top 18 houseplants to have in your home for cleaner air. These plants are effective at removing benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, xylene, and ammonia from the air. The 5 chemicals that have been linked to negative health effects.

Trichloroethylene is found in printing inks, paints, lacquers, varnishes, adhesives, and paint removers.

Symptoms associated with short-term exposure can include excitement, dizziness, headache, nausea, and vomiting, followed by drowsiness and coma.

Formaldehyde can be found in paper bags, waxed papers, facial tissues, paper towels, plywood paneling, and synthetic fabrics.

Symptoms associated with short-term exposure can include irritation to nose, mouth, and throat, and in severe cases, swelling of the larynx and lungs.

Benzene is used to make plastics, resins, lubricants, detergents, and drugs. It’s also found in tobacco smoke, glue, and furniture wax.

Symptoms associated with short-term exposure can include irritation to eyes, drowsiness, dizziness, headache, increase in heart rate, headaches, confusion, and, in some cases, can result in unconsciousness.

Xylene can be found in rubber, leather, tobacco smoke, and vehicle exhaust.

Symptoms associated with short-term exposure can include irritation to mouth and throat, dizziness, headache, confusion, heart problems, liver and kidney damage, and coma.

Ammonia is often in window cleaners, floor waxes, smelling salts, and fertilizers.

Symptoms associated with short-term exposure can include eye irritation, coughing, and sore throat.

These are the 18 plants:

Dwarf Date Palm

Filters out: Formaldehyde and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Boston Fern

Filters out: Formaldehyde and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Kimberly Queen Fern

Filters out: Formaldehyde and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Spider Plant

Filters out: Formaldehyde and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Chinese Evergreen

Filters out: Formaldehyde and Benzene from the surrounding air.

Bamboo Palm

Filters out: Formaldehyde and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Weeping Fig

Filters out: Formaldehyde and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Devil’s Ivy

Filters out: Benzene, Formaldehyde and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Flamingo Lily

Filters out: Ammonia, Formaldehyde and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Lilyturf

Filters Out: Ammonia, Trichloroethylene and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Broadleaf Lady Palm

Filters out: Ammonia, Formaldehyde and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Barberton Daisy

Filters out: Formaldehyde, Trichloroethylene and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Cornstalk Dracaena

Filters out: Benzene, Formaldehyde and Trichloroethylene from the surrounding air.

English Ivy

Filters out: Benzene, Formaldehyde, Trichloroethylene and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Variegated Snake Plant (aka Mother-In-Laws Tongue)

Filters out: Benzene, Formaldehyde, Trichloroethylene and Xylene from the surrounding air.

The Snake Plant is a water-wise plant, so great for drought-stricken provinces.

Red-Edged Dracaena

Filters out: Benzene, Formaldehyde, Trichloroethylene and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Peace Lily

Filters out: Ammonia, Benzene, Formaldehyde, Trichloroethylene and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Making it one of the best air purifying plants to have in your home.

Florist’s Chrysanthemum

Filters out: Ammonia, Benzene, Formaldehyde, Trichloroethylene and Xylene from the surrounding air.

Making it one of the best air purifying plants to have in your home.

It is also important to note that some of these plants are considered toxic to pets. You will need to make sure you purchase the appropriate plants for your household. NASA recommends placing at least one plant per 100 square feet in your home or office space, this will maximise the plant’s air purifying qualities.

See the helpful infographic below:

Credit: lovethegarden.com

Sources: NASA via Bored Panda
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About the Author

Tyler Leigh Vivier is a writer for Good Things Guy.

Her passion is to spread good news across South Africa with a big focus on environmental issues, animal welfare and social upliftment. Outside of Good Things Guy, she is an avid reader and lover of tea.

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