Blind
Photo Credit: BackaBuddy - Supplied

Supportive and kind Shireen Hermans has been a pillar in her support group, and now it is her turn; this legally blind mom of two is ready to get her sight back.

 

Cape Town, South Africa (27 June 2022) – Eyes2Eyes is the charity working to support Shireen Hermans, a 29-year-old mom of two from Mitchells Plain, who has steadily been going blind due to an eye condition called Keratoconus. The charity hopes to raise R25,000 to help her regain her sight.

Eyes2Eyes is a registered Non-Profit Organisation passionate about changing the lives of people with avoidable blindness from cornea disease. Through the supply of new diagnostic technology and highly customised scleral lenses to patients with cornea disease in South Africa, they are giving people the gift of sight and reducing the devastating impact of blindness.

Shireen was referred to the NPO for further support in November 2021 after nearly a decade of sight loss. Sadly eye-related treatment in the state medical system is lacking, and many people will go blind before gaining access to life-changing treatment. For Shireen, treatment consists of specialised lenses from New Zealand that will restore her sight. With only 8% of her sight left, she is classed as legally blind, but there is hope so long as she can get her lenses.

Raising two girls has been incredibly tough with her condition. Shireen feels like a failure sometimes because she is unable to read to her girls or even see their faces anymore. Her dream is to be able to see them clearly again.

“Restoring my vision will mean I can recognise the faces of my family and friends – not just their voices. I will be able to read to my girls. I wouldn’t have to rely on my daughter to read me prices at the stores and guide me with things all the time. Having my sight restored means I can get back to work and help with our financial problems at home. I will get my confidence and independence back and stop living a blurred depressed life, where I have to pretend everything is good” – says Shireen

The organisation hopes to raise the R25,000 needed to restore her sight. The money will be used for the following:

  • All Optometry Appointments
  • Multiple Cornea Scans and Mapping
  • Lens Design
  • Cost of lens manufacture and import
  • Training
  • Four months follow-up evaluation
  • Take home cleaning and storage solutions
  • Family Support and counselling

Once Shireen is recovered, she looks forward to finding a job, walking her girls to the bus and spending time with family again. The lenses will significantly improve her quality of life and restore her dignity to be able to care for herself. If you would like to help Shireen see again, you can do so here.


Sources: BackaBuddy – Supplied
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About the Author

Tyler Leigh Vivier is a writer for Good Things Guy.

Her passion is to spread good news across South Africa with a big focus on environmental issues, animal welfare and social upliftment. Outside of Good Things Guy, she is an avid reader and lover of tea.

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